Home Channels Cancer Meet the Editors: Amy LeBlanc of BioVox to Attend "T Cell...

Meet the Editors: Amy LeBlanc of BioVox to Attend “T Cell Memory” Meeting

-

Next week in Banff, Canada, immunologists with expertise in basic lymphocyte biology, vaccinology, and cancer immunotherapy to discuss the most recent advances in immunological memory towards translational impacts at the Keystone Symposia on “T-Cell Memory.”  This exciting and dynamic field has drawn the attention of editors, including Amy LeBlanc, Chief Editor of BioVox, an online platform specializing in life sciences breakthroughs.

Based in Belgium, BioVox covers global scientific trends in both academia and industry, so this is a hot topic for their coverage, which includes in-depth articles and a monthly newsletter.  The recent scientific advances in this field, and clinical implications for cancer treatment, vaccine development and as targets against many other diseases, have brought the field to the forefront in both basic research and translational medicine.

Here, LeBlanc shares her insights into the vast potential of this field, and what she hopes to gain in attending the meeting, which will cover the latest developments in:

      • Harnessing T cells against cancer
      • T cell migration and resident memory in tissues like skin, liver & intestine
      • Role and dynamics in chronic infections
      • Longevity and maintenance
      • New vaccine concepts against HIV, malaria, tuberculosis, cancer, influenza and more

 


Follow up-to-the-minute coverage of the “T Cell Memory” meeting on Twitter:

#KScellmemory @KeystoneSymp


An Interview with Amy LeBlanc, Chief Editor of BioVox

Quote image: Profile image amy leblanc - "I'm hoping to get a good overview of the latest developments in T Cell Immunology from both the fundamental and clinical settings. AS immunology-focused research is moving at a breakneck speed, this meeting presents a perfect mix of basic T cell biology with new potential avenues for healthcare applications.  There is so much we have yet to learn about memory T Cells, but what we do know has really changed modern medicine in recent years."

What aspects of this conference are you most excited for?

I’m looking forward to the Keystone Symposia T cell memory conference as it will undoubtedly provide valuable insights into this rapidly evolving field. Our news platform, BioVox, covers exciting breakthroughs in the life sciences, and there is so much happening in T cell immunology right now; especially regarding advances in vaccinology and cancer immunotherapy.

I am hoping to learn about the latest research in immunological memory, so that BioVox can bring these exciting topics to a broader audience around the world.

I must admit, I am also looking forward to attending this conference as it is being held in such a stunning location: the Canadian Rockies. Keystone Symposia has a reputation for quality events, both in terms of the science presented and the spectacular settings in which they take place!

 

What stories from this event are you wanting to share with your audience?

I’m hoping to get a good overview of the latest developments in T cell immunology from both the fundamental and clinical settings.

As immunology-focused research is moving at a breakneck speed, this meeting presents a perfect mix of basic T cell biology with new potential avenues for healthcare applications.

There is so much we have yet to learn about memory T cells, but what we do know has really changed modern medicine in recent years.

Unfortunately, when the general media broadcasts news related to scientific breakthroughs, it is often with an overly optimistic or generalized perspective. This, in turn, decreases the public’s trust in both science and the scientists themselves, particularly when they hear of miracle cures that never eventuate. It is why quality science communication is so important: so that we can share the latest research news with a broader audience, without sacrificing factual integrity.

At BioVox, this is what we strive for: science communication done right. Our audience includes readers from around the world who are interested in the latest developments within the life sciences. I wish to share with them the most recent immunological memory findings, to give an accurate insight into this fascinating field!

 

CAREER INSIGHT:  What are your top tips for good science communication?

Number one for me is always: know your audience. Try to take into consideration what the knowledge and motivation is for the people you are trying to communicate with. A big part of success here is to “lose the jargon”. We’ve all heard this said, but most still struggle with it. It can be very hard to take a step back and actually think through “what words and expressions are actually familiar to the person I’m talking to?” This absolutely applies in the scientist-scientist context as well!

Cross disciplinary research is more important than ever, but it can be hard to break through the bubbles we construct for our separate fields.

My second piece of advice is to strip it down. Whatever your research is about, try to think of the simplest way you can explain it without sacrificing any accuracy. Most people don’t want too many details; they’d rather have an overview and to get an idea of the big picture. A good way to do this is to find metaphors that can help bridge any gaps of knowledge: if it can help you get your point across, don’t be afraid to use your imagination.

Finally, I think it is important to try to find the story in your work.

This is a common thread that will help people remember the facts and fit the information into a broader context. People are built for storytelling, so a narrative is often the best way to do this. It doesn’t have to be a heartfelt tale of human suffering: something as simple as your thought process and motivation for conducting the research may do.

 

What’s the best way for attendees to get in touch with you at the meeting?

Attendees at the conference can reach me via:

 

About the Author

Profile image amy leblanc

Amy LeBlanc, MSc — Chief Editor, BioVox

Amy LeBlanc is the chief editor of BioVox, a news platform specializing in life sciences breakthroughs. Based in Belgium, BioVox covers global scientific trends in both academia and industry with in-depth articles and a monthly newsletter. She also works as a science communicator for Turnstone Communications, a company which provides strategic and hands-on communications support for research institutes, healthcare organizations and biotechs.

Based in Belgium, LeBlanc moved to Europe after graduating with a MSc from the University of Melbourne, Australia. She has a passion for quality science communication, increasing diversity in STEM and likes to spend her free time cooking or birdwatching.

 

 

See More Editor Insights on the Keypoint Blog:

Meet the Editors: Salvatore Fabbiano, Cell Press’ New Journal “Med”, Seeks Stories at “The Global Virome” Meeting

Shannon Weiman
Shannon Weiman
Shannon Weiman earned her PhD in Biomedical Sciences from the University of California, San Diego, specializing in microbiology and immunology. Prior to joining the Keystone Symposia team, she worked as a freelance writer for leaders in academic, industry and government research, including Stanford University’s Biomedical Innovation Initiative, the University of Colorado’s Biofrontiers Program, UCSF, the FDA and the American Society for Microbiology.
 

Keystone Symposia on Molecular and Cellular Biology is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization with a 47-year history of convening open, peer-reviewed conferences that connect the scientific community and accelerate life science discovery.